Prof Andy Hill

Prof Andy Hill

Professor Andy Hill is Director of the La Trobe Institute for Molecular Science (LIMS) at La Trobe University in Melbourne. He gained his PhD at Imperial College, London and held post-doctoral positions in the MRC Prion Unit (London) and in the Department of Pathology at the University of Melbourne as a Wellcome Trust Prize Travelling Research Fellow. Andy joined the Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology at the University of Melbourne in 2002 and moved his lab into the Bio21 Institute when it opened in 2005. In 2015, Andy moved his laboratory to LIMS where he was appointed Head of the Department of Biochemistry and Genetics.

Andy’s research team uses in vitro and in vivo models to look at how abnormal proteins travel from cell to cell in neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s and prion diseases. He is currently the President of the International Society for Extracellular Vesicles.


Dr George Morstyn

Dr George Morstyn

Dr Morstyn is a medical graduate of Monash University, and obtained a PhD at the Walter and Eliza Hall Institute and a FRACP in medical oncology following a fellowship at the National Cancer Institute in the US. Dr George Morstyn has more than 25 years’ experience in the biotechnology industry including as Senior Vice President of Development and Chief Medical Officer at Amgen.

Dr Morstyn had overall responsibility globally for drug development in all therapeutic areas including neuroscience at Amgen, and was a member of the Operating Committee. Prior to joining Amgen, Dr Morstyn was the principal investigator on the earliest clinical studies of the haemopoietic colony stimulating factors (CSFs). The CSFs were subsequently approved and launched, and were a major medical breakthrough that have been used to reduce side effects of chemotherapy and enable transplantation in more than 20 million patients worldwide.

Since returning to Australia, Dr Morstyn has been a non-executive director of various for-profit and not for profit companies and biotechs. He is currently a Director of Actinogen Medical and Limos Therapeutics.


Dr Eugene Maraskovsky

Dr Eugene Maraskovsky

Dr Eugene Maraskovsky completed his PhD in Immunology at the Walter and Eliza Hall Institute in 1991. He was Senior Scientist and Project Leader working on cytokine discovery and translational research at the Immunex Corporation in Seattle.

He joined the Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research in 1998 as Joint Head of the Cancer Vaccine Laboratory. In 2002 he became a Principal Scientist and Group Leader at CSL Limited establishing a key capacity to measure immune responses in patients receiving ISCOMATRIX® vaccines. He is currently the Executive Director of CSL and Head of the Cell Biology and Physiology Division within CSL Research at the Bio21 Institute.

Dr Maraskovsky is also an Associate Professor at the University of Melbourne. He has over 110 primary publications (including 19 invited review articles on dendritic cells, vaccines, cancer and infectious disease) in international, peer-reviewed journals. He is a co-inventor on 29 patents and has presented on his research, as an invited speaker, at several international conferences and congresses.


Prof Nick Hoogenraad AO

Prof Nick Hoogenraad AO

Prof Nick Hoogenraad completed a PhD in Biochemistry in 1969. He commenced his lifelong interests in medical research when he joined the Pediatric department at Stanford University in 1969 as a post doc and in 1971 as an Assistant Professor in Human Biology. He returned to Australia in 1974 to join the new department of Biochemistry at La Trobe University and returned to the Biochemistry department in Stanford in 1979 as a visiting professor.

In 1990 he was awarded a Personal chair in Biochemistry and became Head of Biochemistry at La Trobe in 1993. Professor Hoogenraad was appointed Head of the School of Molecular Sciences at La Trobe University in 1998. He helped establish the La Trobe Institute for Molecular Science and became its Executive Director. In 2010 he was awarded a Charles La Trobe Distinguished chair in Biochemistry.

He is internationally known for his work on mitochondrial biogenesis, discovering a new mitochondrial stress response, and has won many major awards for research. He has been active in translational research in the Cooperative Research Centres for Diagnostic Technologies, the CRC for Diagnostics and the CRC for Biomarker Translation.


Prof David Bowtell

Prof David Bowtell

Professor Bowtell is co-Head of the Cancer Genomics and Genetics, and Women’s Cancer Programs at the Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre. He is also a Visiting Professor at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, and was Director of Research at Peter Mac for a decade from 2000-2009. Professor Bowtell has an extensive background in human cancer genomics. He is Principal Investigator for the Australian Ovarian Cancer Study (AOCS), one of the largest population-based cohort studies of ovarian cancer in the world involving over 3000 women, and CASCADE, a rapid autopsy study.

Professor Bowtell’s research has focused on the classification of ovarian cancer, mechanisms of primary and acquired drug resistance, and the role of BRCA1/2 and related mutations in ovarian cancer genetic risk and therapeutic response. His work is part of the International Cancer Genome Consortium.


Prof Michelle Haber AM

Prof Michelle Haber AM

Professor Haber joined Children’s Cancer Institute as a staff scientist in 1984. She was appointed Director of the Institute in June 2000, Executive Director in June 2003 and member of the board in November 2003. Professor Haber is known for her world-class research into the treatment of neuroblastoma and acute lymphoblastic leukaemia in children. Professor Haber holds a conjoint appointment as Professor in the Faculty of Medicine at the University of New South Wales.

She has served as President (2010-2012) and currently serves on the Steering Committee of the International Advances in Neuroblastoma Research Association. In 2007 Professor Haber was appointed a Member of the Order of Australia for services to science in the field of research into childhood cancer, to scientific education and to the community. In 2008, she was awarded an Honorary Doctorate from the University of New South Wales for her eminent service to the cancer research community.

In 2014, Professor Haber was awarded the Cancer Institute NSW’s Premier’s Award for Outstanding Cancer Researcher of the Year, and in 2015 she was appointed an Inaugural Fellow of the Australian Academy of Health and Medical Sciences.


Prof Ashley Dunn

Prof Ashley Dunn

Chair, Scientific Advisory Committee

Prof Ashley Dunn became Head of the Molecular Biology Program at the Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research (Melbourne) in 1982. Two years later he and colleagues molecularly cloned GM-CSF, a cytokine used to aid recovery of bone marrow in cancer patients following chemotherapy treatment.

He served as Associate Director of the Institute until 2004, is currently a Professorial Fellow of the Department of Surgery at the University of Melbourne and serves on several scientific advisory boards.